How To See Most Recent Posts on Facebook

Are You Upset Facebook Doesn’t Let You View Most Recent Posts?

Facebook has gone through quite a few changes lately and because they have, many users are not too happy.  One of the biggest complaints seems to be that Facebook has set the default view of posts to “Top Stories, instead of “Most Recent”.  What does this mean?

Top Stories

Any post that you post yourself, comment on or like that continues to get additional likes and comments.  These posts stay at the top of your newsfeed.   The downfall of  Top Stories being set as the default, you may miss out on a lot of posts by your friends and family.

Most Recent

The most recent posts by the people in your network regardless of the activity on that particular post.

If you are one of those individuals who would rather see the most recent posts of your friends, family and co-workers, instead of seeing the same post at the top of your news feed just because someone has commented on it, here’s the easy change you can make.

As shown in the image below – all you need to do is go to your main news feed and click on the little arrow to the right.  You will see the option of choosing Top Stories or Most Recent.  As you have probably noticed like almost everyone else on Facebook, Top Stories is the default setting.  All you need to do is select Most Recent.

How To See Most Recent Posts on Facebook

So, what’s your stance on Top Stories versus Most Recent?  Do you prefer to see the most recent posts by all your friends and family or do you like to keep up with conversations? How do you feel that Facebook has again decided to make changes that affect the way we use their platform?  Has it changed your views about Facebook or changed how much you use Facebook?  Post your comments – I’d like to know!

Do You Use Your YouTube Playlist?

YouTube Playlist

Do you use your YouTube Playlist?  You Should!

If you have a YouTube Channel, you should definitely create a YouTube Playlist to highlight your videos you want your audience to view the most. Otherwise, they will continue to move further and further down the queue and unless tagged properly, won’t get viewed as often as you want them to.  Why put your audience through the head-ache of sifting through your videos when you know your best content?

Here is an instructional video to show you how to create a YouTube Playlist:

The great thing about YouTube playlists is you can create several, show a few, or just show one.  It’s entirely up to you.  You get to showcase the videos you choose.  They are easy to edit so if you only want one playlist, you can add and remove videos as necessary.   Have you set up your YouTube playlist?

 

The Evolution of Follow Friday on Twitter

followfriday

What is Follow Friday?

When I first started using Twitter back in 2007, Follow Friday wasn’t even around.  In fact, it wasn’t until January 2009, a blogger named Michah Baldwin obsessed with the idea that people wouldn’t know who to follow unless he recommended them.

courtesy of #mashable
courtesy of #mashable

The idea of  Follow Friday is genius.  Recommending your followers to follow someone you follow, or are friends with, converse with on Twitter recommending someone else they know and follow.   Back when it was originally started, people would recommend just a few people on that Follow Friday until the next week.  People would actually get followed.

The problem now however, is we have people doing #followfriday recommendations in bulk loading so many names in one tweet there is no room for the actual recommendation.  Sometimes the people being recommended are not actual people at all, but bot accounts!

Twitter bot account

This bot account was relatively easy to spot.  It still had the egg for the avatar, has zero followers and is following zero people and does not have the bio filled out.  Some bot accounts have avatars, followers and bios.  This is why it is so important to tweet back and forth with people BEFORE recommending them on #followfriday or any other day for that matter.

Let’s say you want to would like to participate in Follow Friday, but find individual  recommendations too cumbersome.  You have other options.  Here are a few tips:

  • If you follow people you know and trust who give great Follow Friday shout outs.  You can RT those and favorite to use at a later date.
  • HootSuite has the bulk upload option using Excel.

Hootsuite bulk upload

 

The initial file setup will take some time, but once you have it set up, all you need to do is change the dates.  I recommend spacing your tweets 30 minutes apart.  Each tweet will also need to be unique.  Hootsuite does not allow duplicate posts.  I also like to copy and save several files not just for #followfriday, but also  to use on any day so I can recommend many more people and vary the message.  I always use the #follow hashtag.  Don’t forget to save the file as the .csv file format (comma delimited).

  • Another option is to use a third party application call Bundlepost.  Bundlepost uses this same format, but in a more user-friendly format.  You can check it out with a 30-day free trial.

So, when you see all those #followfriday posts in your stream, don’t go running to Facebook… at least not until you post your own #followfriday tweets for your tweetfriends.

What do you think about #followfriday? Do you follow people when you see someone recommended?

Why you should configure your LinkedIn profile

Why configure your LinkedIn profile?

I was recently asked how to block someone from a LinkedIn account.  I researched LinkedIn and while I was unable to technically “block” someone from an account, I did find ways to change your privacy settings by configuring my LinkedIn profile to make it more difficult for someone to be “stalked” once you have disconnected from them.  If you want to be more private on LinkedIn, here are the steps you may want to follow:

Step 1

Click on your image, or your avatar you have uploaded into LinkedIn in the top right hand corner and select Privacy and Settings  You will probably have to enter your password even though you are already logged in.

how to linkedin image 1

 

Step 2: 

Turn on/off your activity broadcasts.  This LinkedIn feature notifies all of your connections all of your activity.  If you are in the process of tweaking your profile, I would recommend turning this feature off.  If you don’t want people to know what you are doing, leave the activity broadcasts in the off position.

linkedin-image-2

Step 3

Select who can see your activity feed:

Who do you want to see your LinkedIn activity feed?  Everyone? Your network? Your connections? Or only yourself?  You may ask – what’s the difference between your LinkedIn network and your connections?  Your connections are people who are actually connected to – 1st degree connections.  Your network are people who are 2nd & 3rd degree connections.  If you want to be private, you will want this setting to be only yourself.

linkedin-image-2a

Step 4

Select what others see when you’ve viewed their profile.  You can choose to show your LinkedIn profile, be somewhat anonymous or completely anonymous.  The purpose of social media is to make connections and network, so for me, I don’t personally understand why you would would remain anonymous, but that’s me.  If you want to be completely anonymous – this is where you would make this change.  If you view someone else’s profile they will not know who viewed their profile.

linkedin-image-4

 

Step 5

Show/hide “viewers of this profile also viewed” box.   You can see the example below that belongs to Carly Alyssa Thorne – “People Also Viewed”.  She has this feature turned on.  If you do not have this feature turned on – this box would not show.

linkedin-image-3a

 

When this box is checked – this is an example of what they will see.  You can see by looking at the example below, Carly shares her activity.  She is connected to Lori Wilk, and was endorsed by Alexandar Alexandrov.   She also shared a blog post.

linkedin-image-5

We’re going to skip over who can see your connections and go straight to

Step 6 Change your profile photo and visibility

I think this is probably the most important LinkedIn feature.  Your LinkedIn profile photo is your first impression to the business social media network.  You should take this opportunity to use a professional quality photo.  I would highly recommend NOT using a poor quality photo, NOT using a company logo, NOT using a photo where you cannot clearly see your face or that does not represent you in a professional manner.  This photo needs to instill trust and professionalism.  This photo needs to be welcoming without being inappropriate or overtly sexual.  This photo needs to be current.

And finally – in answering the question of the person who was trying to block the individual who was being a “stalker”.  Since she had disconnected from that person, all she needs to do now, is change her settings to show her profile only to people she is connected to.

Don’t forget to SAVE each time you make changes to your LinkedIn profile.

linkedin-image-7

 

I hope these instructions help you with any problems or questions you may have been experiencing.  Remember, if you have any questions in the future… just post them on my Facebook fan page https://www.facebook.com/YourSocialMediaMogul

 

How to Manage Your LinkedIn Skills Endorsements

linkedin skills endorsements

LinkedIn Skills Endorsements hit the scene back in September 2012

Many people were not fans and by the looks of it, some are still fighting them by not participating.  How do you make the best of LinkedIn Skills Endorsements?

  1. List your skills.  You can add and manage your skills in the Skills & Expertise section of your profile when it is in edit mode.  Pick at least ten.  LinkedIn will give you variations of the same skill so setting your skills can take a while.  For instance, I was offered several endorsement opportunities with the words Social Media  so I took advantage by listing all that were applicable. You don’t have to ask for the Skills Endorsements to receive them and depending on your settings, you will get an e-mail notification when you receive one.
  2. Hide skills you don’t want to show.  This is something many people don’t realize you can do.  It’s beneficial to hide skills for a few reasons.  Perhaps someone gave you an endorsement for a skill you don’t believe applies to you.  Perhaps you are looking for a job and you want your endorsements to be focused on the skills necessary for the job you are interviewing for.  Perhaps you want more endorsements on skills at the bottom of your list.  Here’s a quick video to show you exactly how:
  3. According to LinkedIn’s overview,  you can only give or receive endorsements to and from your 1st degree connections. This brings up the age old argument between those who have thousands of 1st degree connections and those who only connect with those whom they personally know and trust.  It is easy to assume those with thousands of 1st degree connections will more than likely get more skills endorsements than those who do not.   The more people you’re connected to, the greater your reach and the more possibilities you have to get help reaching out to a potential employer, client or consultant.  Please do not misunderstand, I’m not saying to go out and connect with every person on LinkedIn, I’m just pointing out the likelihood of the number of endorsements you could receive in relation to the number of 1st degree connections you have.
  4. It’s a good idea to reciprocate skills endorsements.  If someone went to the trouble to endorse you for skills you listed, or even for some skills you have but forgot to list, why not reciprocate?   Let’s say you’ve reciprocated to the point there are no more opportunities to endorse them for a skill.  How do you interact with them to stay in their news feed then?  All you need to do is look at the Activity  box right below their photo.  This box will show what this person has been up to on LinkedIn (if they have their settings to show this information), click See More.  If they have shared blog posts or commented on items, you can interact with someone this way as well.  This is also a good opportunity to meet in person for coffee or to network.

So, for a quick recap of managing your LinkedIn skills endorsements: List the skills you want, hide the ones you don’t want to show, connect to more people if you want more endorsements and reciprocate.

Do you have any LinkedIn skills endorsements tips?